Tips for Entering


emma_penny.jpgGroup Head of Content Emma Penny looks at how you can make the most of your award entry.

Entering and writing an award entry can seem a daunting task so just where do you start, and what do you need to include?

1. 

We have made the entry forms as straightforward as we can. There are just a few questions and a word limit to stick to, but you can send us pictures and/or videos to back up your entry. All entries are completely free.

2.

Getting started is easy – look at the categories and choose which of them you would like to enter. You can enter more than one category, but you will need to complete an entry form for each one.

3.

After deciding what you might like to enter, register on the website and you will get access to an entry form. If you are not online, you can call Sarah Murray, Event Marketing Executive on 01772 799423 to ask for an entry form or additional help with your entry.

4.

The theory of entering is easy. Break down what the category is asking for and make sure you answer everything in the criteria. As one awards expert told us, ‘do not waste your time trying to impress without looking at the criteria’.

5.

You can make entering easier by thinking about the story you would tell someone who you had just met about what you have done. How would you describe what it is, what it does and its benefits? We want to know the background, the thinking, the process, the execution and the results.

6.

It is also useful to back up your story with evidence – our judges all sign up to absolute confidentiality, so the more numbers, facts and proof of the success of what you are doing, the more likely you are to grab their attention. If you make a claim, back it up with numbers where you can.

7.

We know agriculture faces a great number of challenges, and many of them can be addressed by innovation. We are looking for evidence of projects, businesses and people who have found new and better ways of getting things done.

8.

Tell us what is different about what you do, and bear in mind it is not necessarily about how big the project is, but the judges will want to know it is delivering successfully.

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